Latest tweet from @rssp55.
    Showing posts tagged Immigration
    Sad but true.  I’ve been more than a little ashamed at the behavior of my countrymen with regards to the refugees. 

    Sad but true.  I’ve been more than a little ashamed at the behavior of my countrymen with regards to the refugees. 

    176 07.17.14
    Comments
    thepeoplesrecord:

Dear President Obama,
I am Ju Hong, the “heckler” that interrupted your speech at the Betty Ong Center in San Francisco last week. I spoke up not out of disrespect, however, either for you or our country. No, I spoke up — and am writing to you now — to ask that you use your executive order to halt deportations for 11.5 million undocumented immigrant families.
My family came to the United States from South Korea when I was 11 years old. Like many immigrants, my mother brought me to this country to seek a better life for her children.
I graduated from UC Berkeley, and am now pursuing a Master’s degree in Public Administration at San Francisco State University. I have lived in America now for 13 years. I consider this country as my home. During my senior year in high school, however, I learned that my family had overstayed a tourist visa. We are undocumented immigrants.
As an American without papers, I was not able to get a job, obtain a driver’s license, or receive governmental financial aid. When my mother was sick and in severe pain, she did not visit a doctor because she cannot procure medical insurance. And when my family’s home was burglarized, she refused to call the police because she was afraid that our family would be turned over to immigration officials and deported.
Like many other undocumented immigrants, I was living in the shadows and living in fear of deportation. However, I have decided to speak out and stand up.
Immigration reform is not only a Latino issue, it’s also an Asian and Pacific Islander issue — in fact, it is a human rights issue. Currently, two million of the estimated 11.5 million undocumented immigrants in our country come from Asia. Under your administration, 250,000 undocumented Asian/Pacific Islander immigrants have been deported. While we only make up five percent of the country, we are disproportionately impacted by your immigration policies.
Last week, I was formally invited by White House staff to hear your remarks on immigration reform in San Francisco. As I stood in the stands behind you, I was hoping to hear about your plan to address the lives of 11 million undocumented people living in this country, like my family. And while you expressed your support for comprehensive immigration reform, you did not address how an average of 1,100 immigrants are deported every single day under your administration. You did not address how you deported 205,000 parents of U.S. citizens in the last two years. You did not address how, because of your administration’s record number of deportations—nearly two million immigrants in five years, a record—families are being torn apart: spouses are being separated from each other, parents are being separated from their children, and our brothers and sisters are being separated from one another. You did not to address how your administration would end the anti-immigration deportation programs like “Secure Communities." You’ve deported more people than any other president in the U.S. history.
Interestingly, you talked about Angel Island during your speech. What you did not mention, however, is that more people are detained every single day in detention today than were detained yearly at Angel Island. You recognized Angel Island as a dark period in Chinatown’s history, but you failed to recognize that more Asians and Pacific Islanders are in detention today than were in detention under the Chinese Exclusion Act. In fact, your administration detains up to 34,000 people per day, a record number of detainees in U.S. history.
Because you failed to address these issues, I was compelled to address the concerns of our community.
You claim that the President of the United States has no authority to stop the deportations. And yet, in June 2012, before the 2012 election, which you won with the help of Latino and Asian voters, you implemented Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. With the stroke of a pen, you dramatically changed the lives of hundreds of thousands of young people like me who can now live without the daily threat of deportation, and can legally work in this country for the first time in our lives.
I know that you support comprehensive immigration reform. But I also know that you have the power to stop the deportations, and that you have the power to stop the suffering, fear, and intimidation facing millions of immigrants like my family.
Your fellow American,
Ju Hong

Dear liberals, quit voting for people who do not give a shit about you and acting like it’s some big !@#$ing surprise when they act exactly as they always have.

    thepeoplesrecord:

    Dear President Obama,

    I am Ju Hong, the “heckler” that interrupted your speech at the Betty Ong Center in San Francisco last week. I spoke up not out of disrespect, however, either for you or our country. No, I spoke up — and am writing to you now — to ask that you use your executive order to halt deportations for 11.5 million undocumented immigrant families.

    My family came to the United States from South Korea when I was 11 years old. Like many immigrants, my mother brought me to this country to seek a better life for her children.

    I graduated from UC Berkeley, and am now pursuing a Master’s degree in Public Administration at San Francisco State University. I have lived in America now for 13 years. I consider this country as my home. During my senior year in high school, however, I learned that my family had overstayed a tourist visa. We are undocumented immigrants.

    As an American without papers, I was not able to get a job, obtain a driver’s license, or receive governmental financial aid. When my mother was sick and in severe pain, she did not visit a doctor because she cannot procure medical insurance. And when my family’s home was burglarized, she refused to call the police because she was afraid that our family would be turned over to immigration officials and deported.

    Like many other undocumented immigrants, I was living in the shadows and living in fear of deportation. However, I have decided to speak out and stand up.

    Immigration reform is not only a Latino issue, it’s also an Asian and Pacific Islander issue — in fact, it is a human rights issue. Currently, two million of the estimated 11.5 million undocumented immigrants in our country come from Asia. Under your administration, 250,000 undocumented Asian/Pacific Islander immigrants have been deported. While we only make up five percent of the country, we are disproportionately impacted by your immigration policies.

    Last week, I was formally invited by White House staff to hear your remarks on immigration reform in San Francisco. As I stood in the stands behind you, I was hoping to hear about your plan to address the lives of 11 million undocumented people living in this country, like my family. And while you expressed your support for comprehensive immigration reform, you did not address how an average of 1,100 immigrants are deported every single day under your administration. You did not address how you deported 205,000 parents of U.S. citizens in the last two years. You did not address how, because of your administration’s record number of deportations—nearly two million immigrants in five years, a record—families are being torn apart: spouses are being separated from each other, parents are being separated from their children, and our brothers and sisters are being separated from one another. You did not to address how your administration would end the anti-immigration deportation programs like “Secure Communities." You’ve deported more people than any other president in the U.S. history.

    Interestingly, you talked about Angel Island during your speech. What you did not mention, however, is that more people are detained every single day in detention today than were detained yearly at Angel Island. You recognized Angel Island as a dark period in Chinatown’s history, but you failed to recognize that more Asians and Pacific Islanders are in detention today than were in detention under the Chinese Exclusion Act. In fact, your administration detains up to 34,000 people per day, a record number of detainees in U.S. history.

    Because you failed to address these issues, I was compelled to address the concerns of our community.

    You claim that the President of the United States has no authority to stop the deportations. And yet, in June 2012, before the 2012 election, which you won with the help of Latino and Asian voters, you implemented Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. With the stroke of a pen, you dramatically changed the lives of hundreds of thousands of young people like me who can now live without the daily threat of deportation, and can legally work in this country for the first time in our lives.

    I know that you support comprehensive immigration reform. But I also know that you have the power to stop the deportations, and that you have the power to stop the suffering, fear, and intimidation facing millions of immigrants like my family.

    Your fellow American,

    Ju Hong

    Dear liberals, quit voting for people who do not give a shit about you and acting like it’s some big !@#$ing surprise when they act exactly as they always have.

    10777 12.03.13
    Comments

    Am I a bad liberal for thinking this?

    News broke yesterday that the US will stop deporting illegal immigrants who were brought to the US as children, and that this will be accomplished via an order from the Department of Homeland Security.

    Four short years ago, I was one of the many people heaping criticism on George Bush for using non-congressional means and abusing executive orders in an effort to bypass Congress in implementing the conservative agenda. (According to the National Archives, Bush issued 291 executive orders during his presidency.) 

    It doesn’t seem like a huge win to me to see Barack Obama doing the same thing. (Don’t get me wrong, though, I think this cause is noble and I support finding means to end illegal immigration by integrating people into our population.)

    Even if the House has effectively become a committee to sabotage Obama’s presidency, seeing liberals use these kinds of tactics worries me tremendously.  We have multiple branches of government precisely to protect against unilateral exercises of power such as this, and such actions on the part of liberals validate the troubling expansion of executive power we experienced under George Bush. (and make us look like a bunch of hypocrites for criticizing George Bush’s executive orders.)

    3 06.16.12
    Comments

    Another one of these racial profiling/harassment bills passes.

    This time it’s Mississippi

    Ironically, it comes on the heels of Southern Mississippi students chanting "Where’s your green card?" at a Puerto Rican player from Kansas State during the teams’ NCAA basketball tournament game.

    Anyone want to take bets on how soon the disastrous effects of these laws manifest in Mississippi?  We know from similar laws in Alabama and Georgia that laws supporting harassment of minorities have had a calamitous effect on agriculture and education, and it’s only a matter of time before this law wreaks havoc in Mississippi.

    The biggest problem is, legal immigrants and citizens who fit the targeted profile probably don’t vote Republican in the first place, so convincing Republican lawmakers to vote against this crap is a fool’s errand at best.

    1 03.16.12
    Comments

    DREAM Act - Someone, please…

    …give me a valid reason why someone willing to risk their life for this country should not be allowed a green card in return. 

    If a person enters military service to this country, they are not an illegal. (As if someone existing could be ‘illegal’ in the first place.) They are someone who’s using a valid path to citizenship, and risking life and limb to do so in service of the country and to you and I, as American citizens.

    What’s more American than that?

    2 01.27.12
    Comments

    "If somebody is willing to die for America, then certainly they deserve a chance at life in America,"

    -Rep. David Rivera, R-Fla, speaking on his introduction of a new bill similar to the DREAM Act.

    ___

    I couldn’t agree more.  Anyone with the sack to fight for this country unquestionably has earned a right to share in it.

    2 01.26.12
    Comments

    No More Food Stamps for Children of Illegal Immigrants and Low-Income Households in Kansas

    On a whim, I decided to interrupt my football game and take a look at the KC Star, and I really wish I hadn’t. I saw this atrocious gem:

    At a time when Gov. Sam Brownback has vowed to reduce child poverty, the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services — a state agency the governor controls — made a policy change that eliminated food stamps for hundreds of low-income U.S. children whose parents are illegal immigrants. For more households, benefits were reduced.

    This is why you so-called ‘Pro-Life’ people do not deserve to call yourselves pro-life. 

    Do you really think it’s cool for Republicans to give handouts to their golf buddies and literally take food out of the mouths of kids?

    I don’t care if someone’s parents jumped the border.  That is their crime.  Their children have committed no crime, and deserve the full benefits that US citizen should receive, including food stamps.  Their parents’ crimes do not give the state a license to starve them into relocating. What’s even worse is Brownback didn’t stop there, though, he’s unilaterally reducing benefits for all low-income households.

    The moral of the story is… if they call themselves ‘pro-life’, Christian, and ‘fiscal conservative’ in Kansas, they are fucking lying to you.

    11 01.22.12
    Comments

    On The Proposed Mexican Harassment Bill In Missouri

    I got a bit of a chiding for my pessimism from some folks for my New Years Eve post, but bills like this are the reason why I can’t be optimistic for 2012. For better or worse, Republicans have made it their mission to refight all of the major battles of the last century and have also made it a political requirement for high office to demonstrate how much they hate brown people, women, queer people, and atheists.

    So here we are. my own state is considering a bill that would allow wholesale harassment of non-white people.

    I’m going to spend part of my day today writing my state representative and state senator, which is really a waste of time because both are Republican shills who will hop on this bandwagon to appeal to their base. I know this because both thought it was their prerogative to waste my time and tax money on a birther bill last year.

    What will go completely ignored in all of this (by Republicans) is just how destructive these harassment bills are, both culturally, economically, and politically. Georgia lawmakers caused a severe labor shortage and severe economic harm to its farm industry when they enacted their own immigrant harassment bill. In Alabama, schools were alarmed at the drop in attendance following the passage of their immigrant harassment law. Then there’s the whole problem of people being tortured and held illegally in Arizona, and the recent public cases of people being deported when they are, in fact, citizens.

    I hope Missouri does the right thing and torches this moronic bill.

    24 01.10.12
    Comments

    Report: Border Patrol abuses widespread - CNN News

    So, let me get this straight. We torture prisoners of war, our former defense secretary is stripped of legal immunity for having covered up violence and rape of prisoners of war, and we indefinitely detain and torture elderly people, the mentally ill, and teenagers in our Guantanamo Bay facility… and I’m supposed to be reassured that we’re not torturing people who try to jump the border simply because these agents are told not to torture people?

    Yeah, that makes sense.


    Per CNN:


    Back in 2006, volunteers with No More Deaths, a humanitarian organization dedicated to helping migrants along the Arizona-Mexico border, began hearing the same stories from many who had been in the custody of the U.S. Border Patrol.

    Thwarted would-be unauthorized immigrants spoke of being denied water or food during their custody. Others said they were beaten.

    The organization started properly documenting these allegations, and the stories added up to nearly 13,000 testimonies whose results were released in a report this week.

    The findings went beyond denial of food and water. Migrants held by the Border Patrol spoke of being exposed to extreme heat or cold, sleep deprivation, death threats, and psychological abuse such as blaring music with lyrics about migrants dying in the desert.

    A previous report by No More Deaths in 2008 raised the same concerns, but now the number of recorded cases point to a systematic problem.

    “By this point, the overwhelming weight of the corroborated evidence should eliminate any doubt that Border Patrol abuse is widespread,” the report states.

    11 09.23.11
    Comments

    Mexicans No Longer Immigrating to US? - AlterNet

    Interesting

    Between President Obama deporting illegals at twice the rate George Bush did, the still-hobbled economy, and the particularly nasty immigration laws we’ve seen in several states… it would appear that the immigration spike is on a downward trend.

    Per Alternet: 

    It appears that a large wave of immigration to the U.S. which began in the 1990s has now come to an end. The share of the population represented by non-citizens dropped by 5 percent between 2005 and 2009 (the last year for which data are available).

    The fall-off in unauthorized immigration is even more pronounced. Last year, the Washington Post reported that while “an average of 850,000 people a year entered the United States without authorization” in the first half of the decade, “as the economy plunged into recession between 2007 and 2009, that number fell to 300,000.”

    14 07.11.11
    Comments